The City of Vancouver is using insecticides to remove Japanese beetles

Aiya Benaso / April 8th, 2019

The Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) is an invasive plant pest that was first introduced to Eastern North America from Japan in 1916.
(City of Vancouver)

The City of Vancouver is treating public property in the False Creek area for Japanese beetles.

The Japanese beetle is considered an invasive and regulated pest in Canada that feeds on the roots of grass and the foliage of more than 300 plant species, ultimately causing the plants to die.

The City will treat large turf areas and small strips of grass around flower beds, shrubs, and trees. Treatment begins on April 7th at David Lam Park and continues into May at other parks in downtown neighbourhoods.

The larvicide, Acelepryn, is not harmful to you, your pets, other animals, or pollinators like bees and butterflies. It’s sprayed directly on the soil and targets root-eating larvae.

The city will treat large turf areas and small strips of grass around flower beds, shrubs, and trees.

Treatment Schedule

Movement control

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued an order for Vancouver which restricts moving plant and soil materials from outside a movement-control zone.

Nick Wong with the Invasive Species Council of B.C. says the purpose of the movement-control zone is to avoid accidentally moving the beetles, which live in the soil, to other areas.

“We really don’t want them to leave this regulated area of Vancouver, where they can potentially be transported and pose threat to other fruit growing areas.”

What you can do to help

  • Report sighting to the CIFA’s website and to the Report Invasives app.
  • Remove as many adult Japanese beetles as possible by hand and put them in soapy water to kill them.
    • It’s easier to capture them in the early morning because the dew makes it harder for them to fly.
    • Keep the dead beetles and notify the CFIA about the findings.
  • Attract birds tat eat beetles by putting out a birdhouse and food.
  • Do not remove, relocate or interfere with Japanese beetle traps.